Developers and Zielinski agree to scaled down Dover School redevelopment plan

May 8, 2014

By Katherine Keller

The scaled down plan includes 75 residential units and 96 parking spaces. It retains the original 43 housing units in the Dover school, with 23 parking spaces on the west side of the building, and 20 in the building’s lower level.

The scaled down plan includes 75 residential units and 96 parking spaces. It retains the original 43 housing units in the Dover school, with 23 parking spaces on the west side of the building, and 20 in the building’s lower level.

District 14 Ald. Tony Zielinski said he reached a compromise solution today with developers Maures Development Group and CommonBond Communities concerning the scale and scope of the plan for the redevelopment of the Milwaukee Public Schools’ Dover Street School building and land, 619 E. Dover St.

The residential development will be marketed to teachers employed by MPS and other area schools.

The scaled down plan, the fourth iteration since the first plan issued in December, includes 75 residential units and 96 parking spaces. It retains the original 43 housing units in the Dover school, with 23 parking spaces on the west side of the building, and 20 in the building’s lower level.

Screen Shot 2014-05-07 at 11.29.00 PM

 

Two new structures, each two stories, will consist of a total of 32 townhomes-like units. One structure, facing Dover Street, will consist of 13 units with 9 parking spots. The other, facing Potter Avenue, will consist of 19 units with 15 parking spots.

There will be another 29 surface parking spots located between the two new structures, for a total of 96 parking spots.

The eastern section of the parcel, about one-third of an acre, will be leased to St. Lucas Church and School for a playground and parking lot. The current plan indicates a “a potential 92 parking spaces,” 46 on the north end of the parcel and 46 on the south end. The plan shows 46 potential spaces on the south end of the St. Lucas section in the area that appears to be the playground, suggesting that the playground may serve a dual role: playground when school is in session and parking lot during non-school hours.

“Don’t you think these townhouses fit into the neighborhood a lot better than those apartment buildings they proposed before these townhouses? I do.” Zielinski said, when he forwarded the revised developers’ renderings to the Compass. He said he was very pleased with the new plan because the density of the new development was more consistent with the surrounding neighborhood and that there would be less parking and traffic pressure with 75 units than there would have been with the original plan of 110 residential units with 111 parking spaces.

In response to the opposition by Zielinski and residents in the Dover School neighborhood, the developers presented a third revision of its plans in March. The plan retained the original 43 units in the school building, with another 47 in a single three-story building and a total of 104 parking units.

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Facing Potter Avenue, the second of two new structures of the scaled-down plan, consists of 19 units. The Dover School building resides west of this unit.

When the Common Council’s Zoning, Neighborhoods, and Development Committee voted 3:2 to approve the developer’s plans on April 21, despite Zielinski’s appeal to the committee members that they reject it, Zielinski approached developer Barry Mandel, hoping to persuade him to move the new structures from the Dover site to a swath of properties in the 2100 block of South Kinnickinnic Avenue owned by Russell Chicks, about a mile north of Dover Street School. Mandel is a member of the Greater Milwaukee Committee that formed Teachtown MKE, an initiative that includes the Dover School development, to attract and retain new MPS teachers.

Zielinski said that Mandel “liked the property but said they could not split the development.”

Vowing to find the votes to defeat the Dover proposal when it went to the Common Council, Zielinski said he once more appealed to the developers and negotiated with them until the resolution was reached today when they agreed to the scaled down 75-unit plan with 96 parking spaces and new construction that better reflected the residential architecture in the Dover neighborhood.

 

Compare the four plans that have been offered for the Dover Street School redevelopment project:

Dover Site Plan Version 1

Dover Site Plan Version 1

Dover Site Plan Version 2

Dover Site Plan Version 2

Dover Plan Version 3

Dover Plan Version 3

Dover Site Plan Version 4

Dover Site Plan Version 4

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