A list of some of the recent crime activity in Bay View: 4 Assaults; 12 Locked Vehicles Entry; 9 Thefts; 7 Burglaries; 3 Robberies; 3 Vehicle Thefts

February 9, 2015

The following data are a compilation of the crime reports released by the Milwaukee Police Department via the City of Milwaukee’s e-Notify service. These reports are not released chronologically, although the incidents are grouped chronologically below. Some reports are issued weeks after the crime incident, while others are released relatively close to the incident.

Incident Number Crime Type Date Details
142830002 Locked Vehicle Entry 10/9/14 An incident (#142830002) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2143 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 10/09/2014 @ 11:51 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
142900148 Theft 10/17/14 An incident (#142900148) of Theft was recorded at 2130 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 10/17/2014 @ 09:06 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143000107 Locked Vehicle Entry 10/27/14 An incident (#14300107) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2331 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 10/27/2014 @ 02:30 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143000113 Locked Vehicle Entry 10/27/14 An incident (#143000113) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2345 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 10/27/2014 @ 03:11 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143090132 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/5/14 An incident (#143090132) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2141 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/05/2014 @ 06:41 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143110072 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/7/14 An incident (#143090132) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2141 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/05/2014 @ 06:41 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other). If you have any information regarding this crime you can call the District #6 station at 935-7263. If you have any information regarding this crime you can call the District #6 station at 935-7263.
143110087 Vehicle Theft 11/7/14 An incident (#143110087) of Vehicle Theft was recorded at 2878 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/07/2014 @ 02:56 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143120070 Theft 11/8/14 An incident (#143120070) of Theft was recorded at 2317 S HOWELL AV on 11/08/2014 @ 01:59 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143120113 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/8/14 An incident (#143120113) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2671 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/08/2014 @ 07:39 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143130068 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/9/14 An incident (#143130068) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 425 E SMITH ST on 11/09/2014 @ 01:44 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143130077 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/9/14 An incident (#143130077) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at S KINNICKINNIC AV/E WARD ST on 11/09/2014 @ 03:18 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143170091 Locked Vehicle Entry 11/13/14 An incident (#143170091) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2663 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/13/2014 @ 05:21 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143180042 Theft 11/14/14 An incident (#143180042) of Theft was recorded at 2560 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/14/2014 @ 10:06 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
142900125 Burglary 11/17/14 An incident (#142900125) of Burglary was recorded at 2348 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 10/17/2014 @ 06:27 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143240078 Robbery 11/20/14 An incident (#143240078) of Robbery was recorded at 2385 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/20/2014 @ 05:16 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143240081 Theft 11/20/14 An incident (#143240081) of Theft was recorded at 3109 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 11/20/2014 @ 08:25 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143300095 Theft 11/26/14 An incident (#143300095) of Theft was recorded at 2428 S HOWELL AV on 11/26/2014 @ 08:09 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143350074 Assault 12/1/14 An incident (#143350074) of Assault was recorded at 2417-A S HOWELL AV on 12/01/2014 @ 01:29 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Cleared by Arrest.
143350146 Assault 12/1/14 An incident (#143350146) of Assault was recorded at 2440 S KINNICKINNIC AV #510 on 12/01/2014 @ 06:53 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as No Disposition Available.
143440046 Burglary 12/1/14 An incident (#143440046) of Burglary was recorded at 2315 S HOWELL AV on 12/10/2014 @ 11:10 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143370004 Theft 12/2/14 An incident (#143370004) of Theft was recorded at 2759 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 12/02/2014 @ 11:46 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143400058 Burglary 12/6/14 An incident (#143400058) of Burglary was recorded at 2225 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 12/06/2014 @ 10:26 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143440045 Locked Vehicle Entry 12/10/14 An incident (#143440045) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2110 E OKLAHOMA AV on 12/10/2014 @ 10:23 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143460125 Burglary 12/12/14 An incident (#143460125) of Burglary was recorded at 2462 S HOWELL AV on 12/12/2014 @ 04:47 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143470067 Assault 12/13/14 An incident (#143470067) of Assault was recorded at 2649 S KINNICKINNIC AV #4 on 12/13/2014 @ 10:08 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143470150 Burglary 12/13/14 An incident (#143470150) of Burglary was recorded at 2730 S CALIFORNIA ST on 12/13/2014 @ 06:39 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143470153 Burglary 12/13/14 An incident (#143470153) of Burglary was recorded at 2510 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 12/13/2014 @ 06:00 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
143590113 Locked Vehicle Entry 12/25/14 An incident (#143590113) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 2412 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 12/25/2014 @ 09:25 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143640045 Theft 12/30/14 An incident (#143640045) of Theft was recorded at 2871 S ELLEN ST on 12/30/2014 @ 10:31 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
143640099 Robbery 12/30/14 An incident (#143640099) of Robbery was recorded at 3385 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 12/30/2014 @ 03:43 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
150020051 Burglary 1/2/15 An incident (#150020051) of Burglary was recorded at 2730 S CALIFORNIA ST on 01/02/2015 @ 09:54 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Assignment Completed.
150050026 Theft 1/5/15 An incident (#150050026) of Theft was recorded at 510 E LINUS ST on 01/05/2015 @ 07:13 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
150050091 Vehicle Theft 1/5/15 An incident (#150050091) of Vehicle Theft was recorded at 2317 S HOWELL AV on 01/05/2015 @ 04:31 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
150140113 Criminal Damage To Property 1/14/15 An incident (#150140113) of Criminal Damage To Property was recorded at 435 E LINCOLN AV on 01/14/2015 @ 06:42 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
150140119 Locked Vehicle Entry 1/14/15 An incident (#150140119) of Locked Vehicle Entry was recorded at 435 E LINCOLN AV on 01/14/2015 @ 07:30 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
150160103 Vehicle Theft 1/16/15 An incident (#150160103) of Vehicle Theft was recorded at 2023 S KINNICKINNIC AV on 01/16/2015 @ 05:11 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.
150210005 Assault 1/21/15 An incident (#150210005) of Assault was recorded at 2161 S ALLIS ST on 01/21/2015 @ 12:13 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
150210147 Robbery 1/21/15 An incident (#150210147) of Robbery/Robbery was recorded at 830 E POTTER AV on 01/21/2015 @ 09:46 PM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Filed (Other).
150230002 Theft 1/23/15 An incident (#150230002) of Theft was recorded at 2220 S ROBINSON AV on 01/23/2015 @ 12:27 AM. The final outcome or disposition of this incident was recorded as Referred/Closed.

Your input requested: share opinions about Milwaukee County parks on topics from beer gardens to volunteering

February 5, 2015

Public Input Sought on Parks Topics
Parks Director to Engage Public to Better the Parks

Parks Director John Dargle, Jr. invites the public to share opinions on Parks topics—from beer gardens to volunteering—in a series of public input sessions the last week of February.

“We want to hear what is important to our patrons. These meetings will give the public another avenue to have their voices heard,” said Dargle. “This is an opportunity for everyone to provide input on their passion for the Parks.”

Ideas, questions, requests, and concerns may be shared at three upcoming public meetings or via an online comment card.

Town-hall-style meetings will be held from 5:30-7 p.m. on the following dates:

  • Monday, Feb. 23, at the Currie Park Golf Clubhouse, 3535 N. Mayfair Red., Wauwatosa
  • Tuesday, Feb. 24, at the Jackson Park Community Room, 3500 W. Forest Home Ave., Milwaukee
  • Wednesday, Feb. 25, at the Falk Park Pavilion, 2013 W. Rawson Ave., Oak Creek

“We want to keep our finger on the pulse of the community,” said Dargle. “This is the origin of the beer gardens, FootGolf and disc golf courses, nature trails, and dog exercise areas. This is how we gain insight into addressing water-quality and other environmental concerns. This is how we attain a dedicated volunteer base and friends groups. We want to know where the community’s passions lie.”

Previous town-hall style meetings took place in July. Dargle will present a short summary from those public sessions and will highlight upcoming park projects and initiatives.

Comments will be taken at the meetings, online at countyparks.com, and through the mail at Parks Administration, 9480 Watertown Plank Road, Wauwatosa, WI 53226.

Accommodation requests for the meetings should be made at least 72 hours in advance by calling (414) 257-6100.


MKE Mindbody Wellness — another new business on Howell

February 3, 2015

By Sheila Julson

Aleisha Anderson, licensed acupuncturist and co-owner of MKE Mindbody Wellness, 3174 S. Howell Ave., can attest to the adage that timing is everything. She and her husband Jonathan Anderson shared a desire to open their own holistic wellness clinic and saved money in anticipation. They set their sight on the building on the northeast corner of Howell and Euclid avenues that was occupied by The Dentists South Shore.

Anderson was a patient of one of the dentists in the South Shore group and discussed her interest in the building during her dental visits. Then one day her dentist told her they had outgrown the space and were ready to move. “We had wanted to open a clinic in this space for eight years,” said Anderson, who lives near Humboldt Park.

After purchasing the Howell Avenue building and remodeling the interior the Andersons opened Mindbody Wellness in August 2014. Aleisha is the clinic acupuncturist, while Jonathan serves as chief of operations.

Anderson previously worked at Orchid Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture and as an independent acupuncturist with 8branches Chinese Medicine, where she established a client base. She also works one day a week at an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Madison.

Anderson said MKE Mindbody Wellness specializes in acupuncture for mental health, “We treat a wide variety of things, but we work with psych therapists and counselors in the city to focus treatment on depression, anxiety, ADHA (attention deficit disorder), or helping people who have been on medication and still can’t quite get to that place where they feel content.”

Acupuncture, the stimulation of meridians (energy connection/neurological pathway) in the body using thin needles, works by engaging the mind and body with the neurological system, Anderson explained. Stagnation, a big component in Chinese medicine, is when systems stop working properly.

“It’s like when you have an electrical line, and you kink it. On one side, you’re going to have too much energy, and on the other, not enough,” she noted. “Chinese medicine is about the biological system, not the mechanical system. By treating the biological system, the energy flows better and goes where it has to go.”

In addition to acupuncture, MKE Wellness has a certified holistic nutritional counselor, Sarah Philipp, and an integrative health coach, Kerri Weishoff, on staff to help patients achieve optimal health. “None of us are anti-Western or anti-medication,” Anderson said. “I understand why people take Wellbutrin or why someone is addicted to carbs. We’re more about working with that person, rather than telling them to not do something. Let’s be real; we live in a culture that expects a lot from us.”

Philipp’s nutritional counseling consists of grocery store tours and pantry raids, but with a subtle approach. She’ll meet people at their own grocery stores and help them understand what’s behind the labels or she’ll go through a someone’s pantry, not to toss unhealthy food into the trash, but instead to encourage them to gradually replace bad foods with healthy options.

MKE Mindbody Wellness offers an infrared sauna that Anderson said doesn’t get as hot and uncomfortable as a steam sauna, but that penetrates the skin with heat so the person can sweat out toxins.

Despite a fair number of acupuncturists in Bay View, Anderson said they are all friends and refer patients to each other. Anderson charges fees on a sliding scale. “Money shouldn’t be a barrier to healthcare,” she said.

Anderson has a bachelor’s degree in English from UW-Milwaukee, but she always wanted to help people. After receiving brochures from Midwest College of Oriental Medicine (MCOM), she became convinced that would be the appropriate course. She and her husband both attended MCOM. Aleisha earned a bachelor-degree-equivalent oriental medicine certification and her husband earned a master’s degree in oriental medicine at MCOM.

Now that her son and daughter are in elementary school, Anderson said she is able being able to focus on working full time, building her business, and doing what she loves best — growing relationships with her patients and empowering them to take charge of their health.

MKE Mindbody Wellness will participate in Bay View Gallery Night in June, and they were among the businesses that sponsored Bay View Neighborhood’s Pumpkin Pavilion last year. Anderson and her staff are active in Milwaukee’s mental health community. Anderson and her two colleagues attended the Prevent Suicide Greater Milwaukee conference received training, and they collaborate with other mental health specialists.

MKE MindBody Wellness
3174 S. Howell Ave.
414-367-7023
mkewellness.com

Sheila Julson, sjulson@wi.rr.com, is a freelance writer and blogs at cappersfarmer.com/blogs/return-to-our-roots.


First Annual Winter Warm-Up Week Feb. 7-Feb. 15

February 3, 2015

The Bay View KK Business Improvement District (BID #44) and Bay View Neighborhood Association have partnered to present Bay View’s First Annual Winter Warm-Up Week that features “50 Things To Do In Bay View.” The event launches Saturday, Feb. 7, at noon with Burnhearts Bar’s Mitten Fest, a benefit for Hunger Taskforce. Bring gently used winter clothing, nonperishable food and cash donations.

The “50 Things To Do” is a shop-local feature that promotes Bay View businesses and includes a prize basket filled with gifts provided by local businesses and valued at more than $750, according to Carisse Ramos, who is associated with the BID.


BVNA Winter Blast is Feb. 15

February 3, 2015

The 13th annual Bay View Neighborhood Association (BVNA) Winter Blast event will be held Feb. 15 at the South Shore Park Pavilion. Festivities run from Noon until 4pm.

This year features the “first-ever Bay View Pizza Tasting Contest” that kicks off at 1pm. A tasting plate, $5, entitles its owner (“taster”) to a slice of each of the contest entrant’s pizza. Tasters will receive three tickets to cast their ballots for Best Pizza, Best Sauce, and Best Crust. The contest ends when the pizza is gone. (Get there early and buy your tickets!)

Music will be provided by The Get Hot who will begin performing at 2pm. Pizza contest winners will be announced at 3pm.

Other activities include “pizza coloring pages,” games provided by the Boy Scouts, and special appearances by Milwaukee Fire Department’s mascot Sparky and Milwaukee Police Department’s mascot McGruff.

If there is sufficient snow and if weather permits, a quinzee (snow fort) will be constructed in front of the pavilion. Construction will begin at noon. Info: bayviewneighborhood.org and #bvnawinterblast.


Inter-Organizational Council’s 100th Anniversary Banquet is Feb. 16, new location

February 3, 2015

The Inter-Organizational Council’s 100th annual George Washington Birthday Banquet will be held at a new venue this year when it recognizes Jim Wing of WB Bottle Supply as its Person of the Year. The event will take place at Walkers’ Maple Grove, 3555 S. 13th St., Monday, February 16. The reception begins at 5:30pm and dinner at 6:30pm. There will be entertainment and door prizes. For information or to purchase banquet tickets, contact Dennis Loppnow or Pat Koszuta. Tickets are $22 each.


Bay View Historical Society to receive large bequest, proceeds of home sale

February 3, 2015

Hillcrest-2The Bay View Historical Society will receive a bequest by the late Sandra Schuetz who stipulated that the proceeds of the sale of her home be given to the organization.  She was a BVHS member and a weekly volunteer who worked with its archives.

The 4-bedroom brick Tudor, 2017 E. Hillcrest Ave., was constructed in 1929 by masons George Schuetz & Sons. The home is embellished with its original leaded glass windows, light fixtures, kitchen cabinets, bathroom tile, natural fireplace, and woodwork. The city’s 2014 assessed value was $206,000. Circuit Court records list the value of the estate at $305,000 and state that Schuetz had no heirs.

The property will be listed in February. All proceeds from the sale will benefit the Bay View Historical Society and is being handled by Cream City Real Estate. The list price was not determined at press time.


Public Meeting to Discuss Faust Music Site Development Feb. 17

February 3, 2015

District 14 Ald. Tony Zielinski is hosting a public meeting Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 6:30pm in the Legion Hall above Little DeMarinis, 2860 S. Kinnickinnic Ave., to inform residents of development plans for the Faust Music Building on the corner of Kinnickinnic Avenue and Ward Street.

The five-story plan includes 72 apartments — micro, studio, one bedroom and two bedrooms units, about 75 enclosed parking stalls, and approximately 2,500 square feet of retail space. The construction budget is $9.5 million. The developers will raze the side-by-side Faust buildings and the two-story 1922 Cream City Brick warehouse behind it. The developer stated at an earlier meeting that the existing buildings are not salvageable.


PAREN(T)HESIS — Sledding fun

February 3, 2015

By Jill Rothenbueler Maher

NEW Jill Maher Headshot Dec 2013Ever notice how different the first snowfall feels from snow in mid-February? This time of year, kids aren’t excited by new snow, our cars and trucks are dirty with road salt, and we have lost track of a mitten or two.

During the winter doldrums, I am reminded of why I am happy to be raising a child in Bay View. Quick neighborly encounters like seeing friends on the sidewalk during school drop-off perk everyone up, even if we are muffled by winter scarves. We miss the South Shore Farmers Market and Chill on the Hill but we bump into friends at the Avalon Theater and the public library.

Better yet, we can take advantage of a new snowfall and hit a sledding hill. When the wind cooperates, I enjoy South Shore Park. There’s plenty of tree-free hill and we gaze at the lake while we breathe in fresh air. Bonus: We burn a few calories running or walking up the hill.

Beautiful sunsets signal the impending temperature drop and signal that it’s time to head home. They leave us dreaming of summer, or at least spring.

The winter fun goes beyond sledding and I have noticed a lot of people playing hockey at Humboldt Park. Just seeing them play perks me up. It seems like wholesome, fresh-air, low-cost fun (unless they brawl like the pros!).

A friend recently described why she enjoys living in Cedarburg, and I found I could relate to many of her reasons. Here in Bay View we run into friends in the grocery store, we have free music-fueled gatherings, and people are generally friendly. We’ve also got some of the best restaurants in the metro area.

There’s no place I’d rather raise our daughter, even in the dead of winter.

The author is a freelance writer and mother of one. Reach her with comments or suggestions at jill@bayviewcompass.com.


HALL MONITOR Accountability — stop doing to; start doing for

February 3, 2015

By Jay Bullock

Jay1headshotA year or so ago, I wrote a column in these pages called “Accountability for whom?” about a proposed bill in the state Legislature that would have done tremendous damage to public schools, particularly schools here in Milwaukee.

That specific bill died in the last legislative session. Republicans in the Assembly and Senate could not work out their differences, but the idea did not die and, in fact, both legislative houses have made passing an accountability bill their top priority. Everything I wrote a year ago is still true, and I encourage you to dig that column out from the attic or your online archive or wherever it is you’re saving your old Compasses.

In January this year, the Assembly held a hearing on a new fast-tracked school accountability bill. It was so fast-tracked that it was changing even as the hearing was getting underway, with a major part of the bill deleted by its author, Rep. Jeremy Thiesfeldt (R-Fond du Lac).

Because they thoughtfully scheduled the hearing for 10am on a weekday, teachers, parents, and students couldn’t actually go testify about it. Indeed, for the first five hours of the hearing, not one person who works in a school testified, though private-school lobbyists were the first ones up after Thiesfeldt.

But I did take the time to think about what I would have said, had I been able to go to Madison and testify, and though it might seem a little self-indulgent,  or even redundant after last year’s column,  I’d like to offer my thoughts here.

In this bill they are once again talking all about doing to: What are we going to do to failing schools? An early draft of the Assembly bill even said what it would do to teachers at those schools: fire them.

We are not talking at all about what we can do for children or families. The bill references existing programs from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, although testimony submitted by DPI suggested the bill’s author didn’t understand how those programs work. Yet there is no new support offered or suggested for students who are struggling the most. Nothing in the bill addresses poverty or universal preschool or segregation, or, importantly, the billions Republicans cut from the state’s school funding over the last two biennial budgets.

Speaking on Wisconsin Public Radio a few days before the committee hearing, Thiesfeldt acknowledged that a child’s life outside of school, including poverty, can be valid reasons why students aren’t successful in school.

But, he said, that is a “much wider picture” than what his bill was designed to address. Or, to paraphrase, it’s easier to do to than do for.

And what about all that poverty and unemployment and students starting school behind their suburban peers? “Milwaukee’s got to find a way to figure that out,” he said. Or, to paraphrase, good luck with your problems, Milwaukee, and don’t call us.

What about the doing to? What all is involved? Mostly, “failing” public schools, or public schools with too many failing students, will be turned into charter schools, according to the bill. These charters would operate outside of the control of the local school district, and would act as a further drain on school district budgets all around the state because of how they are funded.

Would turning these schools into charters mean, Bay View’s own Rep. Chris Sinicki asked Thiesfeldt, that they might become for-profit schools?

“I suppose it does,” Thiesfeldt answered.

And here I will be fair and say yes, apparently the Assembly bill does have one provision of doing for: It will deliver tax dollars to for-profit charter school operations, transferring Wisconsin tax collections to some shareholders somewhere.

And even then, there’s still nothing about what those charter schools will do for students any differently than their public schools do now.

I try to be charitable and assume that even people with whom I disagree with have good intentions, so I am sure that Thiesfeldt and his allies want to help. But this is not the way.

Jay Bullock teaches English at Bay View Middle and High School and tweets as @folkbum. Email him at mpshallmonitor@gmail.com.


The Vanguard destined to become a Bay View landmark

February 3, 2015

By Jeffrey Zimmerman

PHOTO JENNIFER KRESSE

PHOTO JENNIFER KRESSE

For a town that prides itself on all things sausage (from making them, to eating them, to racing them), Milwaukee has surprisingly few restaurants that singularly celebrate the tasty, tubular link. Sure, you can put on your Sunday best and spend a small fortune on a knackwurst platter in the ersatz-Bavarian downtown dining halls, but the approachable neighborhood sausage house is about as rare as a winter street festival.

That is, until late last October when Bay View’s Vanguard successfully filled this gap in the market. Located at 2659 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. in the space that was occupied by the Home Bar, Vanguard has already established itself as a great place to grab a brat and a beer. Bay Viewers will certainly appreciate that, especially during the long winter months when “street meats” are but a distant memory.

But Vanguard is also so much more.  Artfully combining elements of the foodie culture and the cocktail culture, along with the corner bar culture so central to Milwaukee’s identity, Vanguard is really an artisanal sausage and craft cocktail emporium hidden behind an unassuming Bay View storefront. The brainchild of co-owners Chris Schulist (longtime musician and manager of Bay View’s Cactus Club) and Jim McCann (a partner in Chicago’s Longman and Eagle), and cook Shay Linkus (formerly of Bay View’s Odd Duck), Vanguard offers a wide variety of tasty, well-prepared sausages, ranging from the traditional like bratwurst and mild Italian, to more exotic flavors like longanisa (pork, palm sugar, soy sauce), toulouse (pork, black pepper, garlic, nutmeg, apple), and vegan Italian (seitan, fennel, roasted peppers). Classic sausages ($4-6) are all served on a hearty, freshly-baked roll with condiment choices that include onion, sauerkraut, giardiniera, relish, and sport pepper.

The creativity of Vanguard’s menu is especially on display with the “styled sausages” ($7-8), which include Jamaican lamb currywurst, piri piri pork , and a duck BLT, among others. Daily specials, displayed on a sheet of butcher paper, typically add an additional vegan option. Foodies will appreciate that all of Vanguard’s sausages, except the smoked, are artisanal and made in-house in a downstairs prep area. It doesn’t get more local than that!

Sides are equally imaginative, hearty, and complement the main menu well. Diners can choose from two types of poutine (veal and onion gravy or roasted garlic, $7), baked potato balls or popcorn pork belly ($6). Even classic sides like french fries ($2) come with dipping sauces that run from the whimsically hipster (Cheez Whiz) to the deliciously vegan (deviled avocado).

No visit to Vanguard would be complete without also checking out the libations. A full-service bar offers 12 beers on tap — a wide variety of American and Belgian canned beers, wine, and dozens of whiskeys, bourbons, and ryes, enough to satisfy even the most discriminating of tastes. But the real powerhouse here are the craft cocktails, “draft cocktails.” I sampled the Vanguard Old Fashioned, which was subtle, complex, and bolstered with fresh orange zest.  Additional craft cocktails include the Ol’ Dirty Martini, the Vanguard Manhattan, and the Negroni Punch.

Co-owner Chris Schulist said that he wanted to create a casual, open, and welcoming venue where “a guy in a suit might be sitting next to someone in a Slayer T-shirt.” On this account, Schulist and his team have certainly succeeded. When we visited recently on a bustling Friday evening, every seat in the house was taken. An attentive hostess offered our party the three remaining seats at the bar, which we gladly took as this spot offers the best view of the open grill, where you can watch the cooks firsthand. The atmospherics at Vanguard kept us thoroughly entertained as we waited for our food. The main seating area includes multiple large, wooden community tables, where a diverse and jovial crowd seemed to making new friends.  The music rotation also reflects Vanguard’s open and eclectic concept, running through a wide-range of genres from Latin Lounge to Old School Country to Thrash Metal. Meanwhile — and this is my personal favorite touch — retro 1980s wrestling played on one of two TVs above the bar, along with the Bucks game.

Completely satisfied and slightly buzzed, my party and I strolled up Kinnickinnic where I couldn’t help but conclude that Vanguard makes a wonderful contribution to Bay View’s festive culture of locally-owned bars and restaurants. Vanguard is sure to please, whether you’re stopping in before a movie at the Avalon or coming home from an evening at Burnhearts. The late serving hours (until midnight, and soon 1am Thursdays through Saturdays) and the back patio (open weather permitting) will only add to the Vanguard’s popularity and guarantee it a prominent spot in Bay View’s cultural life.


IN BALANCE — Chinese Medicine encompasses more than acupuncture

February 3, 2015

By Sheri LM Lee

HEADSHOT SHERI LEEAmong the many great restaurants, hair salons, coffee and tattoo shops, you may have also noticed the growing population of acupuncturists in the Bay View neighborhood. As acupuncture gains acceptance through out the U.S., it’s no surprise that the trend is reflected in our community. What you may not know, is that acupuncture is just one part of a whole medical system known as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) or Chinese Medicine (CM).

What is Chinese Medicine (CM)? 

CM is an ancient healing tradition based on concepts that evolved over thousands of years. Chinese medicine takes a holistic approach to healing. By considering the mind-body-spirit connection, CM uses a variety of practices to promote optimal health and encourage the body’s innate ability to heal. It is complementary to mainstream care and looks at the body as whole, not as separate systems. Focus is placed on healing and prevention and on promoting balance, its fundamental belief.

To put it simply, good health is more than the absence of disease.

Acupuncture

Commonly known as the “needle therapy,” acupuncture uses both needle and non-needle techniques to create change in the body. By stimulating certain points of the body, an internal healing process begins to take effect. Since it is relatively safe, effective, and has few side effects, it is a very useful treatment method.

In addition to using needles, various points on the body may also be stimulated with small tools, warming herbs (moxibustion), or other noninvasive tools. If you’re a bit nervous about needles, a needle-less approach can make the experience more comfortable, and it is also a wonderful alternative for children.

Cupping and Gua Sha

These tools apply suction or scraping to areas of the body and are used to increase circulation and to reduce inflammation or tissue restriction. Both are especially useful for pain reduction.

Tui Na (Bodywork and Energy Work) 

Chinese massage employs a variety of techniques from very light touch to deep tissue or point specific work. Acupressure is a form of Tui na.

Food Therapy (Nutrition) 

Food is medicine and the foundation of good health. CM considers the constitution of the individual. Seasonal eating and dietary routine are important influential factors of good health.

Herbal Medicine

Herbal medicine includes tinctures, tablets, teas, and pills that are made with a single herb, or a collection of herbs referred to as a formula. They are prescribed to meet each individual’s needs.

Qi Gong (Breathwork) 

Cultivating energy or “qi” (also called chi) can be achieved with regular breathwork practices. Mindfulness and relaxation techniques help achieve greater awareness of how we connect to our breath.

Tai Chi (Gentle Movement)

Movement is encouraged as a way to connect to the physical body. The adage “no pain, no gain” does not apply. Balance is key and nothing is done to extremes in Tai Chi where the goal it to keep the body’s physical and energetic circulation flowing.

Feng Shui (Environmental influences)

From changing seasons and weather to the flow within our home and workspace, our internal environment is influenced by the external environment. CM emphasizes our interconnectedness to nature.

East vs. West, Must We Choose?

Much like mainstream medicine, CM is a complete medical system. While mainstream medicine focuses more on the treatment of symptoms or diseases than on prevention, it also takes objective data and matches it to standardized treatment. CM takes a different approach, treating the body as a whole and each person individually — and the information you share about yourself (subjective data) is a very important part of diagnosis.

Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine differ greatly in principles, theory, diagnosis, and treatment. But that doesn’t mean you must choose one or the other. They work very well together and the practice is referred to as integrative medicine. Understanding the purpose of each approach is important and allows you feel more empowered as you become an active participant in your healthcare.

Prevention

Our bodies require regular maintenance and may show symptoms of imbalance before a particular disease can be diagnosed. Consider prevention as a part of your health plan.

Bay View resident Sheri Lee, MSOM, L.Ac., LMT operates 8Branches Chinese Medicine, where she and her colleagues encourage and support their patients and help them take an active role in their personal health and well-being. More information: 8branches.com and info@8branches.com.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this column is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or care. 


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