Some lingering opposition to Dover teacher housing

May 30, 2014

By Jay Bullock

Plan Likely to Move Ahead, Gets Committee Approval

At a town hall meeting Wednesday, May 28, prospective neighbors of the Teachtown project that is proposed for the Dover Street School property raised familiar objections, including parking, noise, and traffic. However, opposition was limited to a handful of speakers, and Ald. Tony Zielinski, who organized the meeting, spoke favorably of the latest version of the developer’s plans.

Opening the meeting, Zielinski said, “The overwhelming majority of people I’ve been in communication with approve” of the plan, which reduces the size and scope of the project’s new construction.

The original plan revealed in December, featuring three new buildings and a total of 110 apartment units between new construction and renovations to the Dover building, drew vehement neighborhood objections. In April, a scaled-down plan with just one new building and 90 units, was still strongly opposed by Zielinski and neighborhood residents alike.

Melissa Goins, Teachtown’s developer, told the crowd of about 50 that those objections made the development plan stronger. “Thank you for all of the passion you’ve shown throughout he process,” she said. “It has made this project better.” Goins’ partner, Ellen Higgins of CommonBond Communities, who will manage the project, called the last few months “an enlightening process,” but said that “the end result is a better project.”

“Now it looks like a neighborhood development,” Higgins added.

Mark Ernst, an architect with local firm Engberg Anderson and designer of the Teachtown project, explained the look of the new construction, two buildings with a total of 32 townhouse-style units, comes from Bay View itself. “The inspiration is coming from the scale of the neighborhood. These are stacked flats, similar to a traditional Milwaukee duplex.”

Only a few residents spoke at the meeting, and they mostly criticized the development; neighbors worried about parking, noise, the width of sidewalks planned in the development, and increased traffic both during construction after residents move in.

The developers argued that the current plan is parking-neutral, with 95 planned off-street parking spaces for residents in 75 units with 90 total bedrooms. Ernst added that the density created by this project is less than that of the surrounding neighborhood, and traffic should not be a concern. Higgins insisted that construction would be safe, and neighbors would be well informed of the project’s timetable. Construction on both parts of the plan, renovations to Dover and the erection of new buildings, is to begin in 2015.

Zielinski clearly favored the plan despite the small but vocal opposition. “I wish I could get a plan that 100% of people support, but that’s just not possible,” he said.

On Thursday, May 29, the revised plan passed the Common Council’s Zoning, Neighborhoods, and Development committee, and it will go before the full Common Council June 3.

Jay Bullock teaches English at Bay View Middle and High School and tweets as @folkbum. Email him at mpshallmonitor@gmail.com.


Wisconsin Energy Foundation saves Frolics parade, again; but more donations needed

May 22, 2014

The Bay View Lion’s Club, in partnership with the Oak Creek Lions Community Foundation, will be presenting the South Shore Frolics Parade on Saturday, July 12th at 11am. Because of continued generous contributions from the Wisconsin Energy Foundation and other local donors, enough funding has been raised to secure the needed permits from the City of Milwaukee. We are grateful for the gift that will allow this neighborhood tradition to continue in 2014.Other commitments have come from the Bay View Community Fund, Bay View Neighborhood Association, Landmark Credit Union, WWDDD Crew (a group of family members from the Bay View Neighborhood), and the Dick Satan Trio, who plan to have a float in the Parade again this year.

However, additional funding is needed for performing groups, marketing, and other costs associated with the Parade.  The fundraising work is not done yet, and community support is needed immediately!   If interested in contributing, please contact Patty Thompson at frolicsparade@gmail.com, or 414-403-8003.  Donations can be taken directly at our website.


Update concerning the Texas Avenue Pumping Station pipe repair process

May 22, 2014

The pipe is 72” in diameter at this point, made of steel covered with a black bituminous coating for corrosion protection.  The leak consists of two 3/8” holes within the 1.5” x 3.5” avocado-shaped spot in the yellow circle.  (What appears to be a gash above the yellow circle is a scrape of the bituminous coating but is not the leak.) CREDIT Milwaukee Water Works

The pipe that caused the leak at the Texas Avenue Pumping station is 72” in diameter at this point, made of steel covered with a black bituminous coating for corrosion protection.  The leak consists of two 3/8” holes within the 1.5” x 3.5” avocado-shaped spot in the yellow circle.  (What appears to be a gash above the yellow circle is a scrape of the bituminous coating but is not the leak.) CREDIT Milwaukee Water Works

The Milwaukee Water Works has the following update:

Water main break activity has decreased – the total number of breaks since Saturday, May 17 is now 82.

Progress has been made at the Texas Avenue Pumping Station, and the next steps have been identified:

  • Friday, May 23:  The protective coating (corrosion protection) on the outside of the pipe will be removed from the area of the leak. The full circumference of the pipe at the weld points will be x-rayed
  • Saturday, May 24:  With favorable results of the x-ray analysis, it is possible that welding will commence on Saturday.  Unfavorable results will be reviewed and may cause a delay.
  • Tuesday, May 27:  Where the exterior coating was removed, a new coat of a corrosion-resistant material will be applied.  When completed, backfill will be placed around the pipe.

Next steps will be to fill the pipe with water and do an acoustic leak detection analysis to ensure there are no active leaks in the pipe.

Then, water can be pumped to the Howard Avenue Water Treatment Plant and the work to start up the plant will begin.  Start-up is expected to take three days after water starts flowing.

Source: Milwaukee Water Works Press Release


“Risking Everything: A Freedom Summer Exhibit for Young People” at UWM’s Golda Mier Library May 19 to June 6

May 22, 2014

The UWM Libraries are hosting a major civil rights exhibit: “Risking Everything: A Freedom Summer Exhibit for Young People.” The traveling photo exhibit, produced by the Wisconsin Historical Society, marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer.

The UWM Libraries are hosting a major civil rights exhibit: “Risking Everything: A Freedom Summer Exhibit for Young People.” The traveling photo exhibit, produced by the Wisconsin Historical Society, marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer.
The exhibit tells the story of 1964’s Freedom Summer project, when a handful of activists led 900 northern volunteers and thousands of Mississippi’s black residents in an assault on the state’s segregated political system. Hundreds were jailed, beaten, bombed, and shot for trying to secure basic constitutional rights.

On June 21st, three young workers — James Chaney, Mickey Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman — disappeared near Philadelphia, Miss. They were stopped by the county sheriff’s office, who handed them over to the Klan. After they were killed, their bodies were buried on a remote farm.  While the entire nation watched on TV, the FBI and U.S. military searched for six weeks before finding their remains on August 4th. The FBI arrested 18 men for the murders, including a deputy sheriff. When local officials dismissed the charges, U.S. officials charged the killers in federal court with violating the victims’ civil rights. Most of the murderers were convicted in 1967. CREDIT Wisconsin Historical Society

On June 21st, three young workers — James Chaney, Mickey Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman — disappeared near Philadelphia, Miss.
They were stopped by the county sheriff’s office, who handed them over to the Klan. After they were killed, their bodies were buried on a remote farm.
While the entire nation watched on TV, the FBI and U.S. military searched for six weeks before finding their remains on August 4th.
The FBI arrested 18 men for the murders, including a deputy sheriff. When local officials dismissed the charges, U.S. officials charged the killers in federal court with violating the victims’ civil rights. Most of the murderers were convicted in 1967. CREDIT Wisconsin Historical Society

The Freedom Summer exhibit displays 70 manuscripts, photos, articles and other documents from the Society’s well-known civil rights collections on 16 free-standing banners.

Students from seven local schools will visit the UWM Golda Meir Library, 2311 E. Hartford Ave., to learn about the history of the civil rights movement during the next few weeks. Students will tour the exhibit and participate in a presentation and discussion on Milwaukee civil rights history.

The Freedom Summer exhibit may be viewed in the Daniel M. Soref Learning Commons (located on the first floor west wing of the Golda Meir Library) from May 16 to June 7, 2014. A display of documents and television footage from the Archives Department’s Milwaukee civil rights collections may also be viewed near Classroom B in the Learning Commons from May 19 to June 6, 2014.

A companion website to the Freedom Summer exhibit may be accessed at
http://fsxbt.tumblr.com/
More info: 414-229-5402.

Milwaukee County residents encouraged to help stop Emerald Ash Borer spread

May 22, 2014

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

Milwaukee County Parks encourages residents to take precautions to help stop the spread of Emerald Ash Borer. The state has quarantined some of Wisconsin’s counties, including Milwaukee, to attempt to limit the spread of this insect that kills ash trees.

What is a quarantine?
An EAB quarantine is a system of rules intended to help prevent the spread of EAB. The rules restrict the movement of firewood and ash products out of quarantined areas. Quarantines are administered by the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. 

Why are quarantines important?
When people move infested firewood or anything else that might be hiding emerald ash borer (nursery stock, timber, pallets, etc.), the insect is gets a free ride into new, likely uninfested areas. The chances of this happening increase when those things are moving out of areas that are known to be infested with EAB. Quarantines restrict this movement to reduce the spread of the pest.

Quarantines in Wisconsin
A quarantine has been issued for Brown, Crawford, Dane, Dodge, Douglas, Fond du Lac, Jefferson, Kenosha, La Crosse, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Rock, Sauk, Sheboygan, Trempealeau, Vernon, Walworth, Washington, Waukesha and Winnebago counties. Residents and affected businesses in these counties are restricted from moving any hardwood firewood, ash nursery stock or ash logs or timber out of the quarantine area. Regulated materials can be moved anywhere within the quarantine. In southeast Wisconsin, for example, that includes the eight-county area from Kenosha County up to Fond du Lac and Sheboygan counties. 

The regulations on ash material and hardwood firewood also apply to other quarantined states, including Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, and lower Michigan.

For a quarantine-area map of Wisconsin, see http://datcpservices.wisconsin.gov/eab/article.jsp?topicid=20

Awareness begins now:

  • Memorial Day weekend, the beginning of the summer tourism season, is a time when the risk is high for people to move EAB and other pests to new areas inadvertently on firewood.
  • Milwaukee County is a quarantine area. Firewood should not leave the county.
  • Firewood for camp sites outside of Milwaukee County should be purchased near the campsite or from a state-certified firewood vendor
  • For a vendor list, see http://datcp.wi.gov/uploads/Plants/pdf/CertifiedFirewoodDealers.pdf
  • Residents are encouraged to learn the signs of EAB infestation so that impacted trees can be removed. See http://datcpservices.wisconsin.gov/eab/index.jsp
  • Residents discovering an EAB infestation can make a report by calling the EAB hotline
  • toll-free at 1-800-462-2803 or emailing DATCPemeraldashborer@wi.gov
  • The insect could impact over 356,000 ash trees throughout 15,000 acres of Milwaukee County parklandSigns and Symptoms of Emerald Ash Borer

 

 


Did you know Frank Gomez or John E. Milanowski? — DC Vietnam Memorial project needs their photos

May 21, 2014

CREDIT Wikicommons

CREDIT Wikimedia Commoms

Wisconsin Public Radio and its public broadcasting partners are seeking volunteers to find photos of the 1,244 Wisconsinites whose names are listed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington D.C.  Nearly 1,000 photos have been found as part of the “A Face for Every Name Project,” but images of service men from southeast Wisconsin who lost their lives during the Vietnam War are still needed.

The following men from Milwaukee still need a photo for the wall:

FRANK GOMEZ; MILWAUKEE

DATE BORN: 2/8/1930 DATE DIED: 8/23/1968

JOHN E MILANOWSKI; MILWAUKEE

DATE BORN: 5/5/1947 DATE DIED: 2/19/1968

Madison-based volunteer David Reichenberger said the project was a great way to honor those who lost their lives in the war. “I enjoy the sense of reverie that the process of searching for and finding pictures creates…this sense of being with them, all these years later,” he said.  “Two, I knew, and this project brought them and the others into sharper focus and gave good attention to their sad, but true, reality,” Reichenberger added

Reichenberger says focusing on service members from specific regions of the state will help finish this project and school photos are a good place to start a search. “If you know the town the veteran was from, you could meet with the local high school principal, explain what you are trying to do, ask to see the yearbooks in the library from that era, find his picture, make a copy — done,” he concluded.

WPR has set up a dedicated webpage with more information about the project, the partners involved, tips for finding photos and links to upload photos. To get started see: wpr.org/veterans

 


Bay View Library Super Reader kick-off event is Wed., June 11, 6-7pm

May 13, 2014

Be a Super Reader This Summer!

The 2014 Milwaukee Public Library Super Reader program kicks off on Monday, May 19. Children ages 0-12 can read to earn coupons for a free Cousins mini-sub, Pizza Hut personal pizza, and free or reduced admissions to fun places around town. Teens can read books as part of the “Put Your Face in a Book” reading program and earn food coupons, an MPL stylus pen and a free book. Stop in your neighborhood library for a copy of the reading folder and suggestions from a librarian on great books to read this summer.

Summer Reading Kick Off Events:
Atkinson – Thursday, June 19, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
Bay View – Wednesday, June 11, 6-7 p.m.
Capitol – Tuesday, June 10, 6-7 p.m.
Center Street – Wednesday, June 18, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Central – Saturday, May 17, 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Forest Home – Wednesday, June 18, 6-7 p.m.
Martin Luther King – Monday, June 2, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Mill Road – Monday, June 9, 6-7 p.m.
Tippecanoe – Wednesday, June 18, 6-7 p.m.
Villard Square – Monday, June 16, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Washington Park – Tuesday, June 17, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Zablocki – Monday, June 2, 6-7 p.m.

MORE INFO.


Community gardens in Milwaukee will require permit

May 13, 2014

Permit will likely be free, according to Ald. Nick Kovac’s legislative assistant Amanda Williams.

Among the legislation enacted today by the Milwaukee Common Council is this item requiring the “operator” of a community garden or commercial farming establishment to obtain a permit from DNS.
Number
121382
Version
SUBSTITUTE 2
ReferenceSponsor
ALD. BOHL, WITKOWSKI, KOVAC AND BAUMAN
Title
A substitute ordinance relating to zoning regulations for the raising of crops or livestock.
Analysis
This ordinance clarifies the city’s zoning regulations for agricultural and agriculture-related land uses. Specifically, the ordinance:1. Defines the terms “raising of livestock,” “community garden” and “commercial farming establishment” and specifies the use classification (i.e., permitted use, special use, etc.) of these uses in the various zoning districts.2. Requires the operator of a community garden to obtain a community garden permit from the commissioner of city development or the commissioner’s designee.

3. Permits an accessory building on a residentially-zoned lot not containing a principal building, provided the principal use of the lot is the raising of livestock, a community garden or a commercial farming enterprise. Presently, accessory buildings are prohibited on lots that do not contain principal buildings.

4. Provides that if the principal use of a residentially-zoned lot is the raising of livestock, a community garden or a commercial farming establishment, the maximum total lo…

Click here for full text

 


Engberg Anderson architects selected for Tippe Library full-scale renovation

May 13, 2014

Milwaukee Public Library’s Tippecanoe Branch Undergoing Full-Scale Renovation 

Tippecanoe Library, a branch of the Milwaukee Public Library system (MPL), is slated for a makeover later this year. In his 2014 budget, Mayor Tom Barrett prioritized redevelopment of the library branch system in a multi-year building and renovation program with an investment of $21.5 million over five to seven years. The project calls for rebuilding four branches – Forest Home, Mill Road, Capitol and Martin Luther King – and renovating Tippecanoe library. The four branches scheduled for rebuilding will be redeveloped as part of mixed-use projects – a more affordable approach.

MPL selected Engberg Anderson as the architect for the Tippecanoe project. Engberg Anderson has a successful history of developing new and renovated libraries and most recently completed the new Villard Square Branch, 5190 North 35th Street, in 2011, which received numerous awards, including a Mayor’s Design Award for public/private partnership. Engberg Anderson was selected in a competitive process.

“Our libraries are a vital part of our community – an investment in libraries is an investment in the stability of our city,” said Mayor Tom Barrett. “Great cities have great libraries and a thriving library system improves access to information resources, economic opportunity, literacy, education and quality of life in our neighborhoods.”

“By summer of 2015, users of our Tippecanoe branch will have a brand new library space,” said Library Director Paula Kiely. “As with Villard Square and the soon-to-open East Branch, Tippecanoe users can expect to have a 21st century environment, rich with technology and flexible spaces for interaction and community connection.”

“With community input, we will create a space that Tippecanoe neighbors and library users value,” said Bill Robison, lead Library Architect for Engberg Anderson. “We look forward to being part of such a meaningful community project.”

In the coming months, MPL will hold public input sessions and share more information on the redevelopment plan. A project manager will also be appointed to oversee the multi-year rebuilding project. 

About Tippecanoe Library 

Tippecanoe Library, 3912 South Howell Avenue, was built in 1969. Prior to the move to its current location, the library began in a rented storefront at 3835 South Howell Avenue in 1931. In 1960 the library moved into a building at 3900 South Howell, on the corner of Howell and Howard Avenues, which was formerly the Town of Lake Hall and Fire Department. After the Town of Lake was annexed to the City of Milwaukee, this building was used for a Milwaukee Fire House until 1959. When this building was being razed for construction of the 1969 building, library service was temporarily provided by bookmobile service at the site and then housed at the Lake water tower, 4001 S. 6th St., until the new building was ready. 

Check www.mpl.orgMPL’s Facebook page or Twitter handle for the most current information about Tippecanoe Library about the planned renovation.

Source: Press release from Milwaukee Public Library


South Shore Frolics — Parade needs $13,000 — Can you help?

May 13, 2014

2013 Frolics Parade Spectators

Waiting for the 2013 Frolics Parade to begin. —photo Katherine Keller

South Shore Frolics, sponsored by the Bay View Lions Club, still needs $13,000 in order to stage its annual parade, said Patty Pritchard Thompson, who is helping the Lions find parade funding.

She’s looking for individual donations and sponsorship dollars from businesses and organizations.

If you would like to make an individual donation, you may do so here. Look in the upper righthand corner of the for the DONATION LINK.

If can make a larger donation or want to sponsor the parade, contact Thompson here or call/text 414.403.8003.


Milwaukee Recreation’s Seniorfest 2014 is June 11

May 13, 2014

Milwaukee Recreation will host the 31st annual Seniorfest on Wednesday, June 11 from 9am to 5pm at Milwaukee’s American Serb Memorial Hall, 5101 West Oklahoma Ave. The extravaganza, created for active older adults, will feature bingo, dancing, a variety of exhibits, recreational activities, musical entertainment, door prizes and more. Exhibits and activity stations will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

“Seniorfest is an event that gives active older adults an opportunity to enjoy wonderful entertainment, network with vendors, and lace up their dancing shoes!” said Willie Mitchell, Recreation Supervisor. “We also use this special event to recognize the talents of our ‘Experience Life Award’ honoree.”

Throughout the day, Seniorfest 2014 will feature performances by Sweet Bobby and the Band, Jazzy Jewels, Bobby Way & The Wayouts, Danny Crivello, the Steve Meisner Band, and the Best of Everything Band. The 2014 Golden Idol Winner will also perform.

Tickets are $4 in advance (on sale through Tuesday, June 10) and $5 at the door. Free parking is available at St. Gregory the Great, located on the corner of South 60th Street and West Oklahoma Ave. A trolley will shuttle fest-goers to the main entrance from the parking area. Individuals with handicapped parking permits may park at American Serb Memorial Hall. Call (414) 647-6041 for ticket information.

Milwaukee Recreation is a department of Milwaukee Public Schools, established in 1911 to provide the entire community with affordable and enriching recreational activities. For more information, visit MilwaukeeRecreation.net or contact Brian Hoffer at (414) 475-8938.


South Milwaukee Downtown Market opens June 5 at temporary, alternative location

May 12, 2014

Source: Press release

South Milwaukee Downtown Market Opens Summer Season June 5

Event Moves to Temporary Location due to The South Milwaukee Downtown Market opens its sixth summer season on June 5 at a new temporary home.

Due to road construction, the outdoor market will kick off 2014 in a temporary space only one block away, as Caterpillar and Salvatore’s/Papa Luigi’s have stepped up to grant temporary use of their parking lot on 12th & Milwaukee Avenues. Road construction at the market’s 11th Avenue site is anticipated to be finished in late July, and the market will move back to its original home then.

The market board favored this location because it keeps the event downtown, is close to the market’s normal location and has required vendor space and customer parking.

The outdoor market will be held every Thursday afternoon and evening June 5 through October 9. Hours are 3 to 7 p.m. There will be no market on July 3.

Vendors also continue to show a strong commitment to our market. As of early May, more than 35 vendors have signed commitments for week one, and that number is growing every day. Customers will see many familiar vendors from last year’s market and always some new ones. There will also be prepared food vendors at the market, as organizers want to offer a true “night out” for customers.

The temporary location can host as many as 70 vendor spaces (some with power), a portable restroom and an area for live music. If patrons wish to stay, picnic, and listen to music at the temporary site, they will need to bring their own lawn chairs.

“It’s great to see the community and area businesses continue to rally behind the market,” South Milwaukee Downtown Market Chairman Dave Kieck said. “We have a great event here, and people want to be a part of it. It’s truly become a celebration of all our city has to offer.”

Since its launch in 2009, the Downtown Market has grown to become one of the largest markets in the area, attracting dozens of vendors and hundreds of patrons each week to downtown South Milwaukee for a truly unique shopping experience.

Vendor space is still available for business who make, bake or grow their own products. More information on the South Milwaukee Downtown Market, vendor forms and special events are at www.smmarket.org

Work is already underway on 11th Avenue reconstruction, which, besides a new roadway, will deliver decorative lighting and other features to make the entire corridor more attractive.


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